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Korean

How to Count from 11 to 100 in Korean


How to Count from 11 to 100 in Korean

Published by Ryan from LingoNomad


Featured article photo: Gwanghwamun in Gyeongbokgung Palace, South Korea (CC0 Licensed)

Before going through this lesson, make sure you know how to count from 0 to 10 in Korean!

You will have to learn both the Native Korean and Sino-Korean numbering systems up to the number 100, since both systems are used up to this number. Let's get started!

11 to 100 in the Native Korean Numbering System

11 → Yeol-hana (열하나)

10 in the Native Korean numbering system is Yeol (열), so from the numbers 11 to 19, you will just have to add the numbers -1 to -9 to it.

e.g. Yeol (열) + hana (하나) = Yeol-hana (하나)

Also remember, you would have to "drop the last letter" in numbers ending with -1, -2, -3, -4 as well as the number 20 in the Native Korean numbering system when pairing it with a count noun. So that means, numbers like 11, 12, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 31, 32, 33, 34, and so on will result in a pattern like this:

e.g. Yeol-hana (열하나) + sal (살) = Yeol-han sal (열한살) 'Eleven years old'

Review this concept more in the previous lesson:

12 → Yeol-dul (열둘)

13 → Yeol-set (열셋)

14 → Yeol-net (열넷)

15 → Yeol-daseot (열다섯)

16 → Yeol-yeoseot (열여섯)

17 → Yeol-ilgop (열일곱)

18 → Yeol-yeodeol (열여덟)

19 → Yeol-ahop (열아홉)

20 → Seumeul (스물) 

30 → Seoreun (서른)

40 → Maheun (마흔)

50 → Swin (쉰)

60 → Yesun (예순)

70 → Ilheun (일흔)

80 →  Yeodeun (여든)

90 → Aheun (아흔)

100 → On (온)

11 to 100 in the Sino-Korean Numbering System

11 → Sip-il (십일)

When counting from 11 to 100 in the Sino-Korean numbering system, the mechanism is similar to the Native Korean one. Simply add the numbers -1 to -9 to it. 10 in the Sino-Korean numbering system is Sip (십), so eleven is simply:

e.g. Sip (십) + il (일) = Sip-il (일)

12 → Sip-i (십이)

13 → Sip-sam (십삼)

14 → Sip-sa (십사)

15 → Sip-o (십오)

16 → Sip-yuk (십육)

17 → Sip-chil (십칠)

18 → Sip-pal (십팔)

19 → Sip-gu (십구)

20 → I-ship (이십)

30 → Sam-sip (삼십)

40 → Sa-sip (사십)

50 → O-sip (오십)

60 → Yuk-sip (육십)

70 → Chil-ship (칠십)

80 → Pal-sip (팔십)

90 → Gu-sip (구십)

100 → Baek (백)

Your Turn

Try writing out these numbers in Korean and post them as comments below:

  • 17
  • 28
  • 32
  • 44
  • 57
  • 68
  • 71
  • 85
  • 99

Learn Also


Want More Practice in Korean?

  • Basic Korean (Grammar Workbook) by Professor Andrew Sangpil Byon (변상필) is a useful workbook that you can use to practice your skills in basic Korean grammar points such as forming present and past tense sentences.
  • Check out KoreanClass101.com, a website where you can learn Korean guided by native speakers through audio lessons. You can start learning anywhere from Beginner, Upper Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced levels to practice on listening, vocabulary lists, and grammar pointers to fast track your goal in becoming a pro in Korean!
  • Talk To Me In Korean Level 1 is a useful self-study book designed for absolute beginners to embark on their self-study journey in learning Korean.

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